Welcome to the Law Offices of Corey T. Lee immigration reform blog!

For the next few weeks we intend on bringing you all the latest news regarding the hotly contested Immigration Reform debate that is currently in the Senate and may soon be on the floor of the House of Representatives. We’ll be gathering the most pertinent news articles, discussing the latest developments, and most importantly analyzing and explaining how the immigration reform bill will affect our readers.

The immigration system in the United States is broken. Long have there been calls for its overhaul, to little avail. Numerous immigration reform bills have failed in Congress over the years. Now however, the so-called “Gang of Eight”, a bipartisan group of Senators have drafted the most realistic (and potentially passable) immigration reform bill in decades. Calls from the President and key figures from both parties have suggested that as a nation the United States finally realizes the glaring need for immigration reform. The bill contains provisions for those unlawfully staying in the United States to adjust for legal status. The Congressional Budget Office found that, if passed, the immigration reform bill will cut nearly $1 trillion from the federal deficit over the next decade. Alas, whether or not the bill, with all of its positives, will pass remains debatable. The bill’s fate will ultimately lie with the Republicans. The immigration reform bill already has sweeping democratic support as well as support from the White House. Republicans, on the other hand, including the likes of Senators John Cornyn and Jeff Sessions, are more averse to passing it for two key reasons: they have a disdain for what they believe to be granting amnesty, and they don’t believe that the bill contains sufficient provisions to secure the border. While Republican Senator Lindsey Graham believes that ultimately the bill will garner enough support in the Senate to pass, the key to its ultimate passage will lay in the House of Representatives, where its chances look less promising. John Boehner, the Speaker of the House of the Representatives, has maintained that he will not bring the bill to the floor unless a majority of House Representative Republicans are interested in debating its merits. Thus far, that does not seem to be the case. However, as the vote on the bill looms in the Senate there have been continued bipartisan efforts to appease the reluctant Republicans by strengthening provisions for border security. These efforts, coupled with the promising findings of the Congressional Budget Office, signify that immigration reform in America is finally under the spotlight as it should be, and may very well pass. We hope it does.

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July 11 Immigration Reform Update

On Wednesday the House of Representatives gathered for their first meeting to discuss the immigration reform bill that recently passed in the Senate. Early signs, however, suggest that the Republican-controlled House will not take up the Senate’s version of the bill. In fact, the House of Representatives likely will not move quickly enough to pass the bill at all. House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan even outright stated, “We don’t want to rush anything”. Congress will recess from August 5th through September the 6th and upon their return will enter the annual debate over the debt ceiling, relegating the Immigration Reform bill to the back burner.

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Must-Read News Weekly Update

Boehner Optimistic over Bill Discussions (New York Times)

Boehner hopes to tackle Immigration Reform before Debt Ceiling (Politico)

Critical time for Immigration Reform Bill in House (Politico)

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July 22nd Update

The House of Representatives is set for their annual August recess in two weeks’ time. Signs suggest that Republicans are unlikely to approve any immigration-reform bills before they leave for their recess, which is essentially a death knell for the immigration reform bill that recently passed in the Senate. After the August recess the House of Representatives will once again debate whether or not the debt-ceiling should be raised, thereby relegating any immigration reform debate to the back burner for the foreseeable future. Republicans must address the country’s immigration reform issues if they are to garner more support amongst Latinos and other ethnic groups to remain relevant. However,…

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